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Dan yr Ogof (National Showcaves Centre for Wales)

We are open 7 days a week from Saturday 28th March until Sunday 1st November 2015. We open at 10am, with tickets available throughout the day until 3.00pm (3.30pm during the Welsh school holidays) – this is the last entry time into the visitor attraction. Introduction: The National Show Caves at Dan-yr-Ogof consists of a 17-kilometre (11 mi) long cave system in south Wales, five miles north of Ystradgynlais and fifteen miles south west of Brecon within the Brecon Beacons National Park. It is the main feature of a show cave complex, which is claimed to be the largest in Europe and is one of the major tourist attractions in Wales. The first section of the cave system is open to the public, but the extensive cave system beyond is scheduled as a national nature reserve and is open only to bona-fide cavers. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, Dan yr Ogof was named as the greatest natural wonder in Britain. This is one of the most popular visitor attractions in the Brecon Beacons National Park. The centre gives you a glimpse of the most accessible sections of a cave system which extends for over ten miles underground. It’s one of the most significant natural networks of subterranean passages and caverns in Britain. It attracts experienced cavers as well as beginners, and has been used as a location for Doctor Who (BBC). There's evidence that people lived and buried their dead in these caves in the Bronze Age, over 3000 years ago. Over 40 human skeletons have been found. Recent exploration of the system was pioneered by two local brothers, Tommy and Jeff Morgan, who entered the caves in 1912 using candles and the most basic equipment. They used a coracle to cross underground lakes. Their descendants now own the Showcaves. Visitors enter through a mined tunnel which gives access to a number of impressive areas. The Cathedral Cave, which is 150m below ground and 10m high at one point, is a highlight. Uniquely, it's licensed for marriage ceremonies. Around 1km of safe pathways lead through the caverns. They're well lit so that you can admire the texture of the rock and the many stalagmites and stalactites. There's recorded music and commentaries to add extra atmosphere. Reconstructions show how Neanderthal cave-dwellers used to live and bury their dead here in shallow graves. Beyond the public areas is an extensive cave system that's a National Nature Reserve. This is only accessible to experienced caving club members. The admission fee covers the caves and numerous other attractions at the centre including a dinosaur park, museum, Iron Age farm and kids' play area.

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01639 730284 (National Showcaves Centre for Wales)

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